Starting a divorce may seem daunting. Whether you are contemplating your options or have decided you’re ready for a divorce, consider the following tips from the team at Ferro & Battey LLC, as you take the next steps:

1. A Friend or Family Member’s Experience May Be Different Than Yours

Comparing yourself to a friend or family member who went through a divorce is probably not helpful. You most likely do not have all of the facts about your friend or family member’s case, and even if you did, no two cases are the same. It is best to contact a professional who can give you advice that is specific to your family and case.

2. Have an Understanding of Your Finances and Monthly Living Costs

Where are your bank accounts located? What funds are in your name? Do you have copies of your tax returns? Have you reviewed them? Having this data at your fingertips will make things easier if you are about to start a divorce. However, don’t panic if you do not have this information. Your lawyer can help you get it once the case starts.

3. Have a Bank Account and Credit Card in Your Own Name

While it may sound obvious, many people do not have bank or credit card accounts in their sole name. It is important to make sure you have access to funds in your own name and your own credit card before a divorce starts. Having both will give you some financial security during the case. In addition, your spouse is not required to maintain you on his or her credit card during the divorce.

4. Mind Your Social Media

Facebook, Instagram and other social media platforms have become a major part of everyday life. No matter how private you believe a post to be, there is usually a way for someone to still find it. The same holds true for text messages, e-mails and iCloud accounts. Consider how a post, text or e-mail could affect your divorce if your soon-to-be ex was to find it.

5. Fault is Still Relevant

Connecticut is a no-fault state, meaning that neither spouse needs to establish fault to actually get divorced. Because Connecticut is a no-fault state, many people are under the mistaken assumption that fault (i.e. infidelity, abusive behavior, improper spending) is irrelevant in a divorce action. That is not the case, however. A court can consider the fault of either spouse when making property division and alimony orders.

6. Mediation Might Not Work for Your Case

While mediation is becoming an increasingly popular alternative, it is not right for every case. Sometimes, mediation is used by one spouse to take advantage of the other spouse, who may be more likely to give in. In addition, many mediators are not attorneys and cannot prepare the documents necessary to get divorced; mediators are also prohibited from giving advice and advocating for either party.

7. If You Have Children Continue To Be A Standout Parent

Custody cases are often won by proving that you are the better parent. During a custody case, every action or inaction of each parent will be scrutinized. Therefore, it is important to continue as an involved parent. If you aren’t already familiar, become familiar with your children’s friends, doctors, and teachers.

Keeping a daily diary may also be helpful. Contemporaneously noting whether you helped your daughter with her science project or that your spouse missed your son’s parent teacher conference will help you remember the specifics of each incident later on in the case.

Schedule a Consultation

If you are ready to take the next step, please reach out to the team at Ferro & Battey, LLC. They are committed to helping you understand your rights and be there with you to navigate through the divorce process. They understand that no two divorces are the same, and will take a unique, individual approach to every case. For more information or to schedule a consultation, please contact Ferro & Battey LLC today.

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